March 22, 2022

Growing A Successful Podcast with Adam Adams

by Hacker Valley Studio

Show Notes

Anyone can start a podcast, but what about a successful podcast? What about a podcast that reaches, connects and impacts people for the better? In this episode, Ron and Chris are joined by Adam Adams to talk about what it takes to create a successful podcast. Adam touches on the importance of having quality equipment, a compelling and entertaining message, and great marketing. He explores the reasons why having a broad audience isn’t the best tactic when trying to stand out and why you shouldn’t be afraid to “draw a line in the sand.”

 

Guest Bio:

After selling his first podcast and seeing everything that his show did for his business, Adam Adams founded a company to serve podcasters in a whole new way. Knowing successful business owners have already learned to stay in their lane and focus on revenue generating activities Adam founded Grow Your Show, which is the easy button for podcasters. They make having a top rated podcast as easy as pressing “record”.

 

Sponsor Links: A big thank you to our friends at PlexTrac and Axonius for sponsoring this episode!

 

Links:

Stay in touch with Adam Adams on LinkedIn and Instagram & check out his podcast and website  

Connect with Ron Eddings on LinkedIn and Twitter

Connect with Chris Cochran on LinkedIn and Twitter

Purchase a HVS t-shirt at our shop

Continue the conversation by joining our Discord

Check out  Hacker Valley Media and Hacker Valley Studio

 



Transcript

Hacker Valley Studio: 

Who says tech can't be human?

Adam Adams:

If you only have a podcast that you listen to, you've got a journal, you've got a diary, you don't have a podcast.

Hacker Valley Studio: 

Welcome to the Hacker Valley Studio podcast.

Ron Eddings:

Axonius has crossed the CAASM, the first company to solve the cybersecurity asset management problem. Gartner has recognized cyber asset attack surface management, CAASM, as a category in their Hype Cycle for Network Security 2021 report. Axonius gives us customers a comprehensive, always up to date asset inventory, helps uncover security gaps and automates as much of the manual remediation as you want. Take a look at Axonius and give your team's time back to work on the high value cyber initiatives they were trained to do.

Chris Cochran:

What's going on, everybody? You are in the Hacker Valley Studio with your hosts, Ron and Chris.

Ron Eddings:

Yes, sir.

Chris Cochran:

Welcome back to the show.

Ron Eddings:

Glad to be back again. In the studio today, we've brought in with us a successful business owner and entrepreneur that has actually sold businesses in the past, one, being his podcast, and is now helping the next wave of content creators. Our guest this episode is Adam Adams. Adam has founded his new company, Grow Your Show, which is the easy button for content creators and podcasters. I'm glad to be speaking to Adam, because that happens to be us, but most importantly, Adam, welcome to the podcast.

Adam Adams:

I'm excited to be here, gentlemen. Thank you for having me.

Chris Cochran:

Absolutely. One of our favorite topics in the world is talking about podcasting and obviously someone with as much experience as you launching podcasts, we had to bring you on the show to ask you a bunch of questions, selfishly, for our own personal use. But for the folks out there that don't know who you are just yet, let us know a little bit about your background and what you're doing today.

Adam Adams:

Yeah, my family is mostly entrepreneurs. My stepdad growing up, I used to work for him a lot, because he owned a landscaping company and I liked manual labor. Actually, I hated it, but I did it anyway, from the time I was like six years old, five or six years old, making a buck an hour. Fast forward to the conversations that he and I had, where he told me I had to entrepreneur and real estate investor. Fast forward to 2005, I'm in college and he makes me buy a piece of land, a cabin lot as my first real estate investment.

Adam Adams:

2008, I started investing in multifamily. I've been doing a lot of that. I've owned thousands and thousands of units over the time. It's crazy to think how many different properties and apartment units that we've had. But then, in 2019, I started supporting podcasters like you, like me, to be able to get to the next level, to be able to be the easy button for them so that they can be ranked worldwide without them having to figure it out. So, that's kind of the shortened version. I still do real estate. And then, my main company is Grow Your Show.

Chris Cochran:

Outstanding. Where the heck were you when we were doing all this, beating our head against all these challenges, trying to build podcasts?

Adam Adams:

I was probably beating my head against a wall too at that time.

Chris Cochran:

Yeah. Oh my goodness. It's such an endeavor to launch a podcast and now we have about 10 shows. So, we've got a pretty decent system of building podcasts, bringing on a host, bringing on additional shows, really figuring out what the niche is. But what would you say are some of the changes that you've seen over the last several years of building podcasts? Because now, I felt like we started at a perfect time when podcasts was interesting, but not necessarily the hottest thing since slice bread. It seemed like when things kind of happened in 2020, everybody wanted to get into the podcast game and now it is even more saturated in the market. But what are some of the changes that you've seen over the last few years?

Adam Adams:

When I started podcasting, one thing that was pretty normal back then is you had to edit your own podcast. So, in the beginning, several years ago, people needed to figure out how to be their own producer, their own sound engineer. They had to figure out how to be their own editing team, post production team. They had to put it online themselves and there wasn't very many ways to get support in the beginning. But these days, one of the big changes is there's tons of help that, especially since, like you said, in 2020, there was a significant increase in the amount of people joining, which is another change, but in and of itself. But yeah, they had like 800,000 podcasts in 2019, and in 2020 they were at 1.7, 1.8 million. And now we're at 2.77 million as we're recording today, which is just nuts.

Adam Adams:

But the support has grown. With that, comes some pros and cons. There are some companies out there that are really awesome. And there are some companies out there who are going to do you a disservice. That's a big thing. In the beginning, when there wasn't any companies or you just had your friend do it, you had a lot of... It was easy to trust somebody. And then now, there's a bunch of people getting fake downloads or fake ratings and reviews, robot downloads. And interesting, this third change that we're talking about is like the people skipping the hard stuff and not getting results.

Adam Adams:

Apple, for this third change being auto bots and stuff like this. Apple has found ways of seeing that and they actually are shadow banning people. So, there's people that start podcasts now and then they pay the wrong type of promoter or whatever. And when they do that, they think, "Oh my gosh, look at my stats. They're so great." But unfortunately what's really happening is nobody can find them now, because Apple shadow bands them. They basically make that podcast for the most part disappear. It's very hard to find that podcast. It's on the second or third page of Google, if you will. So, that's a change.

Adam Adams:

I would say the last change that I want to mention before turning it over to you, because I don't want to go too far in or into too much depth, is there's a lot of people that started podcast incorrectly. And like you guys sound beautiful, you both have amazing voices anyway. But then when you put it on the mics that you're using, you're having really, really good quality. Unfortunately, there was two or three people that started a podcast and they did it from their phone. And then they went onto all of these, what are they called, groups of... Like Facebook groups and other forums where there's brand new podcasters. And they're trying to tell everybody, "You don't have to use a mic. Because I have a shitty podcast that nobody listens to ever, because the sound quality sucks and you can too."

Adam Adams:

So, I would say that, in the very beginning, the people that started podcasts were like tech gurus, like your listener probably is, they were tech-savvy people and they got solid mics. And then, a couple of years into it, people are starting to just think that they can record in a room full of windows, no carpet and with crappy mics. So, I would say that, for the middle period, there was a ton of terrible podcasts and at least with our clients, it seems like it's getting back to people using professional mics again. So, there's a few changes there.

Ron Eddings:

So, I would love to hear some of your perspective on what makes a podcast successful. Especially today, when we first jumped on, one of the first things that you said to us was, "Hey, where's the video at?" Is that one of the pillars that is now something that you find necessary for podcasts and content in general? What are some of the ways to stand out or things that you found to be successful in this world, where it's overpopulated and very crowded right now?

Adam Adams:

There's a lot to that answer. So, what makes a podcast successful? It is not video. Although, I have some thoughts on video since you brought it up, I feel like when, even if you're not going to use the video recording for other purposes, even if you've decided and determined, "I'm not doing that, it's just going to be an audio experience only for us." It can still be of much benefit to record the podcast while you have your video feed on, which will just allow for the connection, the facial expressions, the nodding, the cheerleading that you can't see, it can help... You guys do a great job, I'm not trying to say something, but I'm just saying, if you're a podcaster and you're thinking about having video or not, you can be more well-connected with your guests or with your co-hosts if you at least have the video going, or you're doing it in person.

Adam Adams:

But what you can do with video that can be supportive, because you absolutely do not need video for a successful podcast, but what it can do after the fact, if you do record that video, is you can double up by throwing this on YouTube for example, you could also shop up little 30-second, 60-second, five-minute clips out of a 30 to 60-minute interview and use that to get more earballs to your podcast. So, I think, video can be a thing that could help. It's absolutely not necessary. And you guys are great examples, because you're having huge success and you're not even using that.

Adam Adams:

So, as far as audio goes, I think, a thing with getting a successful podcast, as you asked, I think you have to have a really good audio quality. That is absolute one. The next one would be good banter. It needs to be entertaining. So, that would be the next one. Great audio quality, it has to be entertaining. The third one would be, it should as well be educational or inspiring. It should make people feel something and do something after. I think that makes a successful podcast as well. So, entertaining, educational.

Adam Adams:

But here's a couple that a lot of people don't mention. And you mentioned, you asked, how do you get yourselves to stand out? So, here's a couple of things that I think are going to be critically important and one of them is going to be line in the sand and the next one's going to be marketing. Do we have time for me to tell a short story?

Chris Cochran:

Oh, absolutely. Please.

Adam Adams:

All right. Once upon a time there was this guy, his name was Uh, U-H, that's how you spelled his name because he was a cave person, and that's how they did that back then. But Uh, he was playing with a couple of rocks one day and it's was making sparks and he thought it was really cool. And he ended up starting a fire. And at first, he was afraid of this fire, but then he saw some benefits. He saw that this fire was going to give him the ability to be able to stay warm at night. Maybe he could stay outside longer. Maybe he didn't have to always stay in a cave. Maybe he could cook his food. Maybe he could boil water, so he didn't get all of these different things. Maybe he'd also notice that if he put that fire on the end of a stick, he could scare away predatory animals. And so he could be safer and more protected. He could stay up later at night and have a good time with his friends.

Adam Adams:

So, Uh was so excited that he went and told the chief, there was only one chief back then, and the chief was afraid. He was like, "No, this is of the devil. There's something wrong with this. It's some spiritual, horrible thing. And it can even hurt you, watch this." And he tried to touch it. It hurt him. And he told everybody to stay away from fire. But Uh, he decided that he cared about this new movement, this new way of doing things. He thought that it could be helpful for other people. So, he went and grabbed a stick and he drew a big old line in the sand. And he said, "Anyone who wants to stay on that side and do it the old way, you're more than welcome to. But if you want to come on this side, we're going to use fire."

Adam Adams:

So, he drew his line in the sand and he got almost half of the cave people to cross that line onto his side. When he did that, he became a new chief. Now, he's another chief. Now, people are following him. Albeit it's not everybody, but he's drawn his line in the sand showing what he stands for compared to what the other guy stands for. And that's what we need to do as podcasters. I think a lot of people make a mistake, where they want to appeal to every single person out there. They want to help everybody. They're like, "I don't want to lose out on potential listeners. So I'm going to not niche down into anything. I'm not going to draw my line in the sand. I'm just going to be another chief that says the exact same thing as that other chief," and nobody ever follows them.

Adam Adams:

So, one of the things that you need, if you want to stand out, is you got to draw your line in the sand. Basically, I draw my line in the sand in a couple of ways. One of them is ready, fire, aim versus ready, aim, fire. Okay? Everyone else is told that they're supposed to start a podcast, ready, fire, aim. Everybody else is told, "Don't overthink it. You don't need a mic. You can always switch it later. Done is better than perfect." They say. So, I draw my line in the sand and I say, "F that."

Adam Adams:

That is not the way that things should be. We need to find a way to go ready, aim, fire. Take some time. Pay some attention to what you're doing in your podcast. Draw your own line in the sand. Make sure you're doing marketing. Make sure you're doing all these other things right. Because if you only have a podcast that you listen to, you've got a journal, you've got a diary, you don't have a podcast. You're not supporting, you don't have followers, listeners. You don't have anything like that if you're only speaking to yourself. And you will only speak to yourself if you are saying the same stuff as everybody else. So, you've got to find what is your niche? So, like I said, my niche is ready, aim, fire. I want people to know not to just jump in and ruin their podcast.

Ron Eddings:

This podcast is sponsored by PlexTrac, the proactive cybersecurity management platform bringing red and blue teams together for better collaboration and communication. PlexTrac makes cybersecurity teams more efficient, effective, and proactive to help them win the right security battles. Aggregate security data from all of your sources, centralize remediation efforts and deploy a purple teaming platform that facilitates your tabletop exercises. Claim your free purple teaming research report and book a demo of PlexTrac by visiting Plextrac.com/hackervalley, that's P-L-E-X-T-R-A-C.com/hackervalley.

Chris Cochran:

That is such a powerful sentiment. And for one, I'm so glad that we now have somebody that edits our podcast. We used to use one of those AI editors that would take all the uhs and ums, and that story would absolutely be butchered if we did that anymore. But one thing that I definitely wanted to mention is that, you're so right, because we quite often tell everyone like, "Oh, just start, just begin." But I personally take a little bit more time and attention when I do anything, I want to make sure that I'm prepared. I want to put the cycles in to make sure that I am my best self when I show up to do anything.

Chris Cochran:

And I think that's completely fine, that if people just want to try something and get out there, but to also let them know that you're probably not going to get the best response from your community if you don't put the time and attention and the love into it. It's almost like making food, if you make food like, "Oh, just make food and people will eat it." If you don't put the time and attention to learn a recipe, you're probably not going to get the response that you were looking for. But if you put that love into that food and you serve it with love, people can feel it. So, when you think about what got you into podcasting in the first place, what was that origin story for you? Why does it mean so much to you to be in the podcast game?

Adam Adams:

Well, actually, podcasting just changed my whole life, my whole trajectory. It is what allowed me to make the amount of money that I make. It's what allows me to help as many people as I want to help. I wouldn't be able to do any of that if I didn't have a podcast. And I started back in 2017 is when I launched the podcast and it was a podcast about real estate investing. I was doing a lot of real estate investing. My goal was to attract business partners, money partners, to attract more deals, so that I could be more successful. And it ended up skyrocketing my success.

Adam Adams:

Whereas one benefit from having that podcast is that I spoke at a whole bunch of other people's conferences, just because I had a podcast. I guess I'm just as smart as anyone else. I'm not anything special. And now, I'm getting booked to speak all over the country, on stages in front of hundreds or thousands of people. And it blows up my whole business, allowing me, in a good way, blows it up in a good way, not explodes it or-

Chris Cochran:

Right.

Adam Adams:

... yeah. I want to make sure that that's clear to everyone listening. But it blew it up. It allowed me to be able to make more money, charge more money, start coaching other people and have additional sources of income. And anytime that I wanted to close on a deal, anyone who looked me up was able to get a lot of credibility for me through the hundreds of podcast episodes that I had published. So, they knew that I could close. They knew that I could raise the money. They knew that I could et cetera.

Adam Adams:

And it all came because I had this podcast. My idea of having a podcast, I never expected it to get as good as it truly was. It was out of this world remarkable. I was joining people's masterminds that were typically $30,000 to join. And I was getting in these masterminds for free or for like five grand as a founding member or whatever. But they brought me in because they saw my experience, they saw my credibility, they saw my audience size and they just felt like, "Hey, I'm just going to give this to you. I don't need you to pay. I'm going to get my value anyway." So, stuff like that.

Adam Adams:

What happened? I ended up being able to close on a little over $100 million of real estate within a couple of years after I launched my podcast, which was just incredible. It was the biggest two years of my real estate investing journey. And it all came between the exposure that I got, the value that I was adding other people, they were sharing my content, other influencers wanted to connect since we could both work with each other's audiences. I got more people saying yes to letting me buy their deals, because it's been a tough market the last few years, to be honest. So, just so many benefits.

Adam Adams:

If you don't mind me taking a quick pause on the, I was going to say one other thing on making a successful podcast and that's just marketing your podcast and it is a good place to insert it now, because in the beginning of that first podcast, I never marketed mine. I didn't know that I needed to do it. I figured that I would be famous the day that I started the podcast. And I gave you a whole bunch of benefits that came out of the podcast, but none of those would've happened if I didn't do marketing. So, I hosted some events locally in Denver, close to where I live. And I also did a little bit of advertising, marketing. I went crazy with my social media. And because of the marketing, it made me stand out in a sea of, at the time, it was about 800,000 other podcasts, which just kind of blew me up and grew what I was doing.

Ron Eddings:

That is awesome. And you're so modest saying that you're not special, you're not anybody different. I think the hard work and consistency that you're describing is what separates you from others. Maybe we all have that same potential, but very few actually execute on that potential. It almost sounds like there is this relationship that you have between real estate and podcasting. Maybe it's just this entrepreneur spirit. Talk to us a bit about that and how they're related.

Adam Adams:

Yeah. Well, my dad, growing up, he made me read a book called Rich Dad Poor Dad. And my stepdad was my rich dad and my biological dad literally was my poor dad. It's kind of funny, because my bio dad, who I didn't really grow up with, he was an electrical engineer. So, he did just fine. He made money, but he wasn't really investing in stocks. He wasn't really investing in real estate. But then, my stepdad ends up being the guy who teaches me I've got to do all these things. So, one of the relationship pieces is, when I read that book, Rich Dad Poor Dad, and by the way, anyone listening, if you haven't read it, you should, it will change your mind about... It'll change your philosophy on money.

Adam Adams:

At any rate, on there, Robert Kiyosaki, the author, speaks about how he makes his money in his business with his employees and his systems and its advertising. That's where he makes his money. But then, he puts his money into real estate investments with a friend of mine, also Ken, who Robert knew at the time. But the point is that he put his money with Ken and some other operators. And that's how he built wealth over time. It's compounding interest on his behalf instead of on the bank's behalf. So, the relationship, as you stated, to me, it's like, you need to do both. I grew up where my stepdad did both. I read this book and it made so much logical sense, that you've got to be doing both.

Adam Adams:

If you are investing in real estate, you're an entrepreneur automatically. You might not have a giant company, but you're finding ways of making money, staying within the bounds of the law, accounting, and that's still a business, even if you'll just have one rental that might kick off 200 bucks a month or something. It's still a business, it's still a venture.

Adam Adams:

So, the way that you approach building a business is probably the way that you need to approach building your real estate portfolio as well. So, I'm not a real estate coach. I'm not trying to tell everybody that I'm going to help get rich. But you should read that book and you should do both. You can, if you want, you can have a job. I've played this game called CASHFLOW from Robert Kiyosaki as well. And he shows how, if you are investing your money, if you're buying assets with your money, even as a teacher, you could get out of the rat race faster than some doctors or engineers or lawyers. It matters most about where you're putting that money. It's just easier to do it with tax advantages. And just the way that works when you're making all of your expenses before taxes, instead of after them.

Adam Adams:

So, having a business will propel and speed up all of that stuff. So, I would just to anyone, you probably should do both. If you've got the golden handcuffs on and you're working as a who knows what, a senior vice president or whatever, you can still invest in real estate. And if you don't, you're probably going to lose out. You're probably going to just have a high paying job and never get out of the rat race.

Chris Cochran:

It's so great that you're talking about entrepreneurship. And you're talking about leaving a legacy, really, and making an impact in your community. I read something a little while ago about, if you had a podcast that was geared towards the 10 space shuttle entrepreneurs in the world, and you had seven of them to listen to your podcast, you would have probably the most successful podcast in the world, even with just those seven listeners. And you think about the people that make podcasts in the niches.

Chris Cochran:

But when you make in the niches, there's pretty much a finite amount of listenership that you're going to get with that particular podcast. What is the pros and cons that people need to weigh when selecting the community that they want to speak to? Because there might be a podcast out there that meets that threshold, where they either need to adopt something else that need to change, or they need to start a different podcast. What is some of the decision logic that you would supply to those people?

Adam Adams:

It sounds like you're asking what are the pros and cons of selecting your audience for your podcast, whether it's a big audience or a small audience, is that right?

Chris Cochran:

Correct. Yes. Correct.

Adam Adams:

So, my thoughts are, most people, they try to select a big audience. And the biggest problem is that nobody really attaches to it. They think, if I niche down, then I'm going to lose out on opportunities. It's this FOMO. And it's real. It makes us think that by going small, as the niche is on our listeners, our audience, we are going small on our business, but it actually is reverse. What's the way to say that, reverse, it's counterintuitive maybe. The point is that when you niche down and you can speak to an exact person and they feel like you're talking to them, you're going to have, A, a huge fan. B, they're going to start sharing your podcast with more people. So you could actually build your audience much, much faster if you draw your line in the sand, if you show what you stand for, and if you niche it down to just a certain person, you're going to have a lot more success.

Adam Adams:

Our company, we do this, I was just reading one of our clients, their avatar questionnaire, because they're onboarding with us, brand new. His name's Scott. He has a self-storage investing podcast. I'm connected with a lot of real estate people. So, we serve a lot of real estate people just... But not because we're looking for it, but because we already know a lot of them. But Scott, he's got an amazing self-storage podcast, but he hasn't had a whole bunch of listener base in the past, because he didn't really market it and he didn't really draw his line in the sand. It was self-storage real estate investing. So, that was good. As we're going through his avatar questionnaire, I'm starting to understand why they missed out.

Adam Adams:

I literally was just looking at it right before we got on this call. So, it's all fresh in my mind. There's parts on there that says, "Where does your avatar live, geographically? What are they worried about?" There's other questions like, "How many kids does your avatar have? What age is your avatar? Race, gender, job title." All of these things are in there and it doesn't make you racist, or genderist, or sexist, or whatever. It doesn't make you jobist. You're not a bad person for trying to figure out who you speak to.

Adam Adams:

He's got this thing where he's saying like, "30 to 60 years old is my avatar." And I'm thinking to myself, "That is not an avatar, you're still trying speak to everybody, which is why you're speaking to nobody." So, when he can get it down to one person. For example, here's an avatar I used to have with my old podcast, 42 years old, not in his 40s, not 30 to 60, 42 years old, male, not any gender. The guy is male. It doesn't mean that I hate women or something like this. Right? Indian. Okay. He's Eastern Indian. Again, I'm not against any other race, creed, color, anything like that. We have people that invest in our company that are every different place that they're from, Asia and et cetera.

Adam Adams:

But if I figure out exactly who it is, my guy is [Siva 00:31:10]. I've given him a name. I know his job title. I know how many kids he has. I know how much money he has in the bank. It's not a range of money. It's not anyone in this city. He lives here. Now, that I understand Siva, my exact avatar. Now I can start having the best content for him. When other people have their podcasts, and they're just trying to collect anyone and everybody, what ends up happening is they miss the boat and nobody thinks that that podcast is for them.

Adam Adams:

So, to answer your question, pros and cons of selecting an audience. The pros of selecting a small niche down audience are that they know that you know exactly what they're going through. The other pros are, if they know exactly what friend of theirs needs to hear this. Give you a quick example, Dave Ramsey, he's fairly famous. Well, he draws his F-ing line in the sand really well. He tells people that BMW suck. Nobody wants to think that a BMW sucks. They've been praying for the money to buy a BMW their whole life. And they finally bought one to prove that their job was good enough. That the way that they managed money was good enough. And then, Dave Ramsey comes in and says that the paid off mortgage is replacing the BMW as a status symbol. And now, the listener, his followers know exactly who to share his content with, because he's boiled it down.

Adam Adams:

There's people that try to speak to everybody. You and I can't say their name, because they haven't niche down. We don't know who they are. They don't have anything that they stand for. So, we can't share their content with anyone. So, the pros and cons basically, at the end of the day, you just got to niche down, even though it's going to hurt your heart, you're going to be scared, you're going to have that real FOMO, fear of missing out. You're going to feel it. But you got to do it. It's just the only way to have a successful podcast.

Chris Cochran:

That is incredible advice. I sincerely hope people are listening to this. Now, it's the time of the show where we ask the golden question. And we don't usually say that, "Hey, now is the time for the golden question." But I feel like it was appropriate to mention it this time. Because at first, I was going to ask about people looking to start a podcast and that's a pretty small niche. But now, we have quite a few people that listen to the show that have started podcasts, because maybe Ron and I inspire them to start their own show. So, let's niche down even further. What piece of advice do you have for the people out there that are doing podcasting today, but they're having the darnest time trying to grow their influence, grow their impact on their community, and they're just not getting the impact from the craft that they've created, that they're looking for. What piece of advice would you have for them to start being a little bit better tomorrow?

Adam Adams:

Two pieces of advice. One is authenticity. Then other one is to invest in your podcast. Let it pay you dividends later. So, the authenticity, it's interesting. I'm hoping every single person listening at least knows that they need to add value. They at least know that they've got to be funny on their podcast. Entertaining and educational. But if you miss the boat on the authenticity, you're going to lose in so many ways. The authenticity, people have learned to avoid any type of incongruency.

Adam Adams:

We, as humans, see somebody and we are going to say almost immediately, we've got a sipdey sense that says, "Something's off with this person. I don't know what it is. I can't do business with them. I can't share their content with anyone else. Because I just don't trust them for some reason." When you can become completely authentic in your true self and just natural behind the mic, you're going to easily attract the right people and repel the wrong people and it will be fine.

Adam Adams:

A lot of people come onto the podcast and they will either go over the top on the authenticity level or under the top. Basically they will come on and they will think that they need to be completely professional. They can never cuss, ever. They need to pretend like they were born in this other city or whatever. And the point is, they change their accent, they change the way that they talk. It makes no sense. And we, as listeners, think to ourselves, "I don't know what they're hiding, but I just can't listen to this person anymore. I can't share it with anyone." So, that's number one, authenticity. Be your true self. Own it, it doesn't matter if you've got tattoos or whatever. You just own that shit.

Adam Adams:

The second one, invest in your podcast. If you want more impact and influence, basically, if you want to make income and impact, you have to invest in your podcast. Because, like we talked about before, about the diary or the journal, a personal journal, that you're the only one who knows that it exists, that will happen to most podcasts when you're starting a podcast today at a 2.77 million podcasts and you go and try to launch your show. Well, Apple doesn't say, "Oh my goodness, this person just made their very first episode. I've got to make them famous overnight." You've got to do this. It's not if you build it, they will come. If you build it and market it, invest in your podcast, invest in a decent mic, investing good guests, invest in your time, in making sure you have good content for your listener. Invest the time to understand that you even know who your avatar is. And invest in marketing and growth, so you have good artwork. And plus, you're taking the time on social media or paying somebody, my team does this for other people as well.

Adam Adams:

For example, our client, they might push the record button and they are still getting it invested in, because after they push record, it goes up to the cloud. We edit it, we write their show notes, we publish it and we will also promote it across social media automatically. And whatever it is, you've got to invest in it. Either invest in doing it yourself or invest in a team that does this stuff for you. But you cannot expect Apple to say, "Oh, goody, goody, this person started a podcast today. I've got to make them famous tomorrow." They just won't do it. You've got to take matters into your own hands.

Chris Cochran:

Great advice. I seriously hope anyone out there that either has a podcast or is looking to start one is really listening to Adam. Adam, thank you so much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to hop on the mics with us. For the folks out there that want to keep up to date with you and all the incredible things that you're doing in podcasting, what are the best ways that people can do that?

Adam Adams:

Probably the easiest way is they're already listening to your podcast. So, I've got a podcast called The Podcast On Podcasting, POP for short, and you can check it out wherever you're listening to this show. And we're hundreds of episodes in. And I think we can add value to you, if you're looking to do that. And our company is called Grow Your Show. You can find us at growyourshow.com.

Ron Eddings:

Super simple, straightforward, and don't worry, we have you covered on the links, they are in the show notes. Adam, thanks again. And we'll see everyone next time.

Adam Adams:

Thank you.

Ron Eddings:

If you found value in this content, it would mean the world to us if you shared it on social media, sent it to a friend or talked about it over coffee.

Keeping Cyber Course Prices Equitable with Kenneth Ellington

November 29, 2022 Hacker Valley Studio

00:00:00